Friday, January 18, 2013

S A L S A, Edenics Style



[new entry: January 2013]

SALSA         TSaL’TSeL       Tsadi-Lamed-Tsadi-Lamed
TSal-TSELL_______צלצל_______[TS-L-TSS-L à SLS]
ROOTS:   The Indo-European  “root”  of SALSA music  is sal-1 (salt), because the Spanish word salsa means sauce, from the Latin “salt” root.

 Perhaps even Latinos, and certainly white European  lexicographers, considered fast, sensual Caribbean SALSA music to be “saucy” or “salty” (perky to the point of erotic, downright naughty).  The Carribean people who developed this music and dance, were not being salty or saucy – just natural.  The chances are good, then, that a native word similar to S-L-S was mis-heard and misinterpreted.  Because they are humans, the prehistoric language of the Carib people was Edenic.

The given, “salty” theory of the origin of the word SALSA is covered at the “EXULT” entry. סלד  $eeLaiDT means (to spring, jump, leap up, exult). SALT makes food jump up and SALUTE  attention to our taste buds.  But a more audible EMeTology can be offered:

SALSA music has moved its quick-slow-quick-quick-slow percussion beat with wooden sticks, maracas, etc., but the defining rhythm of SALSA was set by the cowbell.

   צליל   TSiLeeYL is a sound, clang, rattle; צלצל TSaL’TSeL is  to ring, clatter.   Israelis now use this word for the ring of a telephone, while the best-known jingle-jangle of this word in Scripture belongs to the “clanging cymbals” of Psalm 150:5.  Arabic ṣalil (rattle, clatter, clash) sounds more like SALSA castanets than orchestra cymbals.

BRANCHES: SHRILL (high, sharp sound) is another fricative-liquid-liquid, like צליל   TSiLeeYL, with no IE “root.”
 In German Schelle is a handbell; schellen is to ring or jingle bells; Schall  is sound, noise; and  schallen is  to resound. [Regina Werling]
    צליל   TSiLeeYL now means any tone or note. Next generation’s etymologies will be more sound.