Tuesday, July 22, 2014

WHERE DID S P E E C H COME FROM?



SPEECH           SaPHaH          Sin-Phey-Hey
Sah-PHAH        שפה       [S-PH-H à SP-CH]
ROOTS:     The oldest, theoretical root for SPEECH and SPEAK is thought to be sprek  (speech.)  The hard  guttural ending is suspect, as in West Germanic and Old High German here is sprahha. The added R (liquidization) was likely not in the oldest form, and later versions tend to drop these unnecessary complications. Witness Old English spec, and our modern SPEAK and SPEECH.
Primarily,  שפה SaPHaH is a lip, see  “BUS” (kiss) and “SIPHON.”    But the primary document of a Proto-Earth language is “the whole Earth was of one speech /  שפה SaPHaH …  “ --  (Genesis 11:1). The R in Germanic, like German  Sprache, may have been added  (liquidization) for easier pronunciation after the ה Hey hardened to CH. 
If  the CH of SPEECH and Sprache are not part of the original root, and the R is, then the Edenic etymon is  ספר $aPeR  to recite (Genesis 40:9), and not  שפה $aPHaH, language (Genesis 10:5).  Other S-P “speech” words may then be better at the “SPELL” entry.
    נשף NaSHahPH is to breathe, blow, exhale; an important mechanical aspect of  שפה $aPHaH, language.  Related by reversal. “Lip” words from שפה $aPHaH at “BUSS.”

  
BRANCHES:                           

  Sin-Phey-Hey (fricative-bilabial-guttural)  שפה $aPHaH, language, speech, lip (see the “BUSS” entry… to buss is to kiss)                Bhāṣaṇa 

Bengali  ভাষা  Bhāā
reverse syllables: ā-bhā
language     S-B = bilabial shift  ( PH to B)
Cambodian pee-a-saa
reverse syllables:
                           saa-a- pee
Language
Danish sp(r)og
liquid added, guttural hard
language                   
Dutch  SP(r)aaK
liquid added, guttural hard
language                    [RW]
English    SPeeCH
guttural hardens, but softer than the German
Speech
German   Sp(r)ache
liquid added, guttural hard
Language
Gujarati ભાષા Bhāā
reverse syllables: ā-bhā
language        S-B
Hawaiian vosa
reverse syllables: sa-vo
speech, language
Hindi भाषा Bhāāna
reverse syllables: ā-bhā
language          S-B
Hungarian  beszel
First 2 root consonants reverse, but maybe from SaPeR, to relate
to speak  S-B
Kannada ಭಾಷೆ  Bhāea
reverse syllables: sea-bhā
language     S-B
Igbo (Nigeria)  sufu
(change in meaning, so see this S-P sub-root at “GOSPELL” and “SAY”
to speak                     [NE]
Indonesian/Malay  bahasa
reverse syllables: a-baha
language          S-B
Marathi भाषण   Bhāaa
Nasalized (N added) M213 guttural drop

Mayan (Uspantec) chabej
S-F S to CH in Church, guttural  shifts, H to J
to speak   S-B              [FA]
Mon-Khmer (Cambodia/Kui) phs  
M213 metathesis to s-a-ph
languiage
Norwegian and Swedish sp(r)ak
liquid added, guttural hard
language                   
Old High German sprahha
liquid added
Speech
Punjabi ਭਾਸ਼ਣ Bhāśaṇa;
zabān
Nasalized (N added) M213 guttural drop; S-F, Nasalized (N added)
speech
Sumerian
zipaĝ S-F  S-G
 breath and speech.     [SW]  
Sundanese Basa Sunda.
 (Sumatra,Borneo)
reverse syllables to  sa-ba
The language of Sunda
Tamil  பேச்சு  Pēccu
F-S. M213
speech
Thai  P̣hās
 reverse syllables:  s'ā-p̣hā
Language
Telugu భాష  Bhāa 
reverse syllables: sa-bhā
Language

Does one begin to suspect that an original  “ speech” word got turned around and diversified ?
More words for "language" at “LICK.”.   

Germanic versions with the extra R, and various guttural shifts include Danish sprog,   An Edenic word with SPR is  ספר $eePeR (to tell -- see "GOSPEL").
Supu and sufu mean to "speak out" in Igbo (Nigeria).  See “SAY.”
 Fernando Aedo adds:
Amerind:
sipriy, lip (Quechua)
sup, talk (Mayan/Chol)
sub, to speak, advise, give information (Mayan/Chol)
chabej, to speak (Mayan/Uspantec)
ch'abej, to speak to (Mayan/Quiche)
sub-en, tell, say (Mayan/Chol)
Egyptian:
spt lip (of mouth, wound or jar)
dialects of Mon-Khmer (
an Austro-Asiatic sub-family of SE Asia, incl. Cambodia):
ps   rim, edge, bank; lips (Tarieng)  ß
phs language (Kui)  ß
ps language (Surin Khmer)

For LanGuage words, like Samoan lāuga, see “LINGUAL.”