Saturday, November 20, 2010

Scrambled Edenic or a New Coinage (based on Edenic)

Sound AND Sense; Scrambled Edenic or a New Coinage (based on Edenic)


Many would-be contributors to the Edenic wordbase are disappointed that I insist on a proposed link to a foreign word having both a viable sound correspondence AND a logical lexical, semantic correspondence. This is why I do not use 95% of the “variants” in Samson Raphael Hirsch’s (SRH) Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew (Feldheim Publ., 1999).


Ben-Yehudah’s dictionary (B-Y). defines the verb נבל NaBHaL as to decay or degrade.   It is a bilabial–liquid synonym of  נפל NaPHahL , FAIL-- see “FALL.” At the Tower of Babel there was this BaLaH   בלה  BaLaH (Genesis 11:7) degradation of the language of Eden, not just a בלל BaLaL, mixing up – see “BALL.”  But our only human language program remained Edenic.  Therefore, different groups of émigrés from Shinar-Sumer –later Babel could either scramble an Edenic word to coin a word in their new language, or (using Edenic) they could coin a new word.

For example, let us imagine two groups encountering their first river, and coining a word for it.  One group would use an existing Edenic river word, but of course would scramble it.  Thus יאור Y’OWR (river) reverses to rio (see “RIO GRANDE”). Other groups, seeing a river from a height, are going to think “snake,” as in  פתן   PeTeN (see “PYTHON”).  Thus, they will have a river word like Greek potamus, found in hippopotamus and the Potomac river in Washington, DC


This important new clarification of Edenic theory emerged from reading the intro to Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch's Etymological Dict. of Biblical Hebrew. SRH is a major inspiration, but 95% of his listed "variants" do NOT fit Edenics requirements for Sound AND Sense correspondence.

Archived posts, Edenics searches + web games:  
Edenics DVDs and most recent book: THE ORIGIN OF SPEECHES. Edenic (Biblical Hebrew) as the original, pre-Babel human language program see our many resources at incl. videos in English, Spn., Fr. or Ger.

Posted via email from Isaac Mozeson